bohemea:

“I’m still in love with Edie,” says James Gandolfini of Edie Falco, the woman who played his television wife, Carmela, for six seasons on The Sopranos. “Of course, I love my wife, but I’m in love with Edie. I don’t know if I’m in love with Carmela or Edie or both. I’m in love with her.” Falco reveals a similar possessiveness over her HBO-wedded husband. “It was weird to sit down at a table read with the actresses playing Tony’s girlfriends. Occasionally I would get a sharp twinge at the back of my neck,” she recalls. “I’d have to kind of keep my bearings and remember, No, no, no, this is your job, and at home you have your life. Even years later, I remember when I saw Jim in God of Carnage on Broadway, and he was Marcia Gay Harden’s husband, and I had this ‘How come I have to be O.K. with this?’ kind of feeling.”
“In the five long years since the screen went black and The Sopranos went off the air, on June 10, 2007, there has grown up a kind of omertà around the show,” writes Vanity Fair contributing editor Sam Kashner in the April 2012 issue, in which he speaks to David Chase, along with many of the actors, producers, directors, and writers who have never before spoken so candidly, about what it felt like to be part of this extraordinary cultural phenomenon.
read more
photo credit: The Sopranos: An American Family - Vanity Fair by Annie Leibovitz, April 2007
Thank you NVC for sending the super sexy link!

bohemea:

“I’m still in love with Edie,” says James Gandolfini of Edie Falco, the woman who played his television wife, Carmela, for six seasons on The Sopranos. “Of course, I love my wife, but I’m in love with Edie. I don’t know if I’m in love with Carmela or Edie or both. I’m in love with her.” Falco reveals a similar possessiveness over her HBO-wedded husband. “It was weird to sit down at a table read with the actresses playing Tony’s girlfriends. Occasionally I would get a sharp twinge at the back of my neck,” she recalls. “I’d have to kind of keep my bearings and remember, No, no, no, this is your job, and at home you have your life. Even years later, I remember when I saw Jim in God of Carnage on Broadway, and he was Marcia Gay Harden’s husband, and I had this ‘How come I have to be O.K. with this?’ kind of feeling.”

“In the five long years since the screen went black and The Sopranos went off the air, on June 10, 2007, there has grown up a kind of omertà around the show,” writes Vanity Fair contributing editor Sam Kashner in the April 2012 issue, in which he speaks to David Chase, along with many of the actors, producers, directors, and writers who have never before spoken so candidly, about what it felt like to be part of this extraordinary cultural phenomenon.

read more

photo credit: The Sopranos: An American Family - Vanity Fair by Annie Leibovitz, April 2007

Thank you NVC for sending the super sexy link!

bohemea:

James Gandolfini, David Chase & a model identified as “a friend” - Vanity Fair by Annie Leibovitz, April 2007
God damn do I ever love James Gandolfini. Big virile alpha male. I take turns fantasizing about being him & being on him.
Also, check out a gorgeous behind-the-scenes video of the editorial. I desperately want to rewatch Sopranos!

Easily my favorite Vanity Fair cover ever! This shot is hanging on my parents’ refrigerator, except they replaced Tony’s face with my dad’s.

bohemea:

James Gandolfini, David Chase & a model identified as “a friend” - Vanity Fair by Annie Leibovitz, April 2007

God damn do I ever love James Gandolfini. Big virile alpha male. I take turns fantasizing about being him & being on him.

Also, check out a gorgeous behind-the-scenes video of the editorial. I desperately want to rewatch Sopranos!

Easily my favorite Vanity Fair cover ever! This shot is hanging on my parents’ refrigerator, except they replaced Tony’s face with my dad’s.